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Alabama's Best Waterfalls

10. DeSoto Falls

10. DeSoto Falls

Named for Hernando DeSoto, this 107-foot waterfall is one of the tallest falls in the state. It's also one of the most-visited, as the main attraction at an eponymous state park, following an incredibly accessible walk from the parking lot to the overlook.

(image via Flickr)

9. Grace’s High Falls

9. Grace’s High Falls

DeSoto Falls isn't the only waterfall at DeSoto State Park. By some estimates, there are over a dozen falls here, when you include the seasonal ones. Grace's High Falls is a 133-foot fall that's accessible via the Canyon Rim Drive. The best time to check this one out is the winter and early spring.

(image via Facebook)

8. Little River Falls

8. Little River Falls

Little River Falls is another waterfall located at DeSoto State Park. The Little River has carved a canyon into the top of Lookout Mountain. Most of the falls here feed into it, but the full force of the river itself leaps over a 45-foot drop at Little River Falls. The breadth and scope of the river are enormous, even if the fall itself isn't tall.

(image via Flickr)

7. King’s Shower

7. King’s Shower

This 396-foot cave fall is the tallest in the state, but that's not the only reason it's cool. This is a cave fall, located inside the Tumbling Rock Cave, that tumbles down from the cave's "topless dome." You'll need basic safety equipment—a helmet and flashlight, for a start—but this is a pretty easy walk. Tumbling Rock is the state's most-visited cave for a reason.

(image via Instagram)

6. Neversink Falls

6. Neversink Falls

Neversink is a 162-foot open-air pit, perhaps the quintessential American pit. The waterfall plunges into the opening, making this site the second-tallest waterfall in the state in addition to being an awesome cave. The pit is 40 feet wide at the top and bells out to 100 feet at the bottom,with two bolts affixed into the ground for spelunkers to attach rigging to.

(image via Instagram)

5. Cheaha Falls

5. Cheaha Falls

Located in the Talladega National Forest, this 30-foot fall flows down from the highest point in the state, Mt. Cheaha. It's almost a 4-mile hike from the parking lot to the falls. There's a beautiful cascade before the main waterfall. Take your time to appreciate it, but don't mistake it for what you came here to see.

(image via Instagram)

4. Noccalula Falls

4. Noccalula Falls

This 90-foot waterfall flows year-round, spilling over Lookout Mountain into a deep ravine. There is a statue here of the legendary heartbroken Cherokee girl for whom the waterfall is named. (You can probably guess said legend doesn't end well, considering what they chose to name after her.) The view is beautiful, and admission to the waterfall itself is free all year.

(image via Flickr)

3. Peavine Falls

3. Peavine Falls

Peavine Falls is part of a 65-foot cascade, and takes its names from all of the twists and turns. The waterfall is located in Oak Mountain State Park, and while it is beautiful here (the leaves in fall are gorgeous), it's a pretty exhausting hike. There's a sign at the entrance telling you whether the falls are flowing on any given day, and since it's not the easiest thing in the world to reach the falls, paying attention to that sign is a good idea.

(image via Instagram)

2. Falling Rock Falls

2. Falling Rock Falls

Falling Rock Falls is located on a 1.5-mile trail near Montevallo. The hike isn't particularly challenging, and you're rewarded by a 90-foot waterfall. In addition to the beautiful plunging water, there's a cave behind the fall, carved out by the water over countless years.

(image via Instagram)

1. Caney Creek Falls

1. Caney Creek Falls

Caney Creek Falls are frequently described as the state's most most beautiful. Located in Bankhead National Forest, just south of the Sipsey Wilderness Area, these falls envelope a picturesque swimming hole. Allegedly, the area is wet enough all year that the falls never dry up.

(image via Flickr)