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10 Gorgeous Beaches That Aren't Devastatingly Hot

10. Deception Island

10. Deception Island

 South Shetland Islands, Antarctica

Deception Island sounds like a lame reality show, but it's actually a hot spring in the South Shetland Islands on the Antarctic peninsula. Located over a partially submerged volcano, you get nice, warm waters but also a beach that's basically a giant shelf of ice. It's the best of both worlds! Plus, Antarctica is an international scientific preserve, so you will finally get some peace and quiet on this beach.

(Image via Flickr)

9. Storesanden and Litlasanden

9. Storesanden and Litlasanden

Eigersund, Norway

Located in Norway, Eigersund has 1,600 feet of sandy beaches and a temperature that doesn't ever quite reach past 60°F. The coastline is forever changing as the wind and surf pound the beach grass and rye that hold the dunes together. Eigersund has all sorts of coastal attractions, too, like the island of Eigerøya, with its WWII memorial and its charming lighthouse. And remember, just because you're in the Arctic Circle doesn't mean you can't enjoy some fantastic surf.

(Image via Flickr)

8. Black Sand Beach

8. Black Sand Beach

Vík í Mýrdal, Iceland

Vík í Mýrdal's black beach is perhaps one of the most visually-striking in the world. If the black basalt sands and nearby puffins aren't enough to pull you in, the volcano that's located close by just might. But honestly, the odd beauty of this place is a draw all its own. The subpolar oceanic climate means that the winters are cold but not terrible, and summer is brief and cool. Record highs have reached 80°F, but typically the average high stays around mid-50°F, even in the middle of summer.

(Image via Flickr)

7. Scarista Beach

7. Scarista Beach

Lewis & Harris, Scotland

Lewis and Harris are technically one island but are referred to as if they were two because of the way they're shaped. Together they make the largest island in Scotland, and they are full of beautiful beaches. Scarista may be the best of them all, with pale golden sand and water that's the shade of blue-green you associate more with the tropics. Best of all, the average high for June and July is a mere 61°F.

(Image via Flickr)

6. Lawrencetown Beach

6. Lawrencetown Beach

Nova Scotia, Canada

Located near Halifax, Lawrencetown Beach is famous for some of the best surf in North America. If you're not into surfing, the average high in Halifax for July and August is less than 74°F, which means that you can take in the gorgeous views—and, when the tide is right, go kite surfing near Stoney Beach. This is the perfect spot in terms of both water depth and wind.

(Image via Flickr)

5. Grenen Beach

5. Grenen Beach

Skagen, Denmark

The weather at Skagen is extremely moderate. While it does get plenty of sun, temperatures tend to float around the low-to-mid 60s, even in the hottest part of the year. What really makes this beach unique is that it is where he Skagerrak and Kattegat Seas meet here. These seas differ in salt content and density, so the two don't quite mix. They fight, eternally, in enormous, crashing patterns of waves and sand.

(Image via Flickr)

4. Castle Island

4. Castle Island

 Boston, Massachusetts 

You're never too far from water in Boston. There’s Revere Beach to the east or the harbor on the North End, just to mention a few. But you'll be hard-pressed to find a better place to see the ocean than the sands of Castle Island. The eponymous castle has been a martial fortification since 1634 and offers tours. Visitors can also simply enjoy the sand and grab some fried seafood or a burger at Sullivan's. Plus, in keeping with our theme, the temperatures never become too punishing.

(Image via Flickr)

3. Old Orchard Beach

3. Old Orchard Beach

Old Orchard Beach, Maine

Old Orchard Beach is a seven-mile stretch of sand. With a pier, slow surf that gently rolls, and an amusement park nearby, it's a great beach for families! It even has super soft sand and fresh lobster to replenish all the energy that the (only slightly warm) sun took out of you. But, if you're looking for something a little more pristine, try Popham Beach, which is slightly out of the way but a bit more nature-centric.

(Image via Flickr)

2. Bondi Beach

2. Bondi Beach

Sydney, Australia

The city of Sydney suffers from the urban heat island effect, but the climate surrounding Sydney is surprisingly mild—especially in the winter. Thankfully, Australian winter is smack in the middle of America's peak summer vacation time. Temperatures in April and May only get up to the 70s Fahrenheit, and during June and July, it's not likely to get much higher than the mid-60s. Unlike other cold beaches, Bondi actually has turquoise water and shimmering white sands that give you a classic resort feel.

(Image via Flickr)

1. Baker Beach

1. Baker Beach

San Francisco, California

Baker Beach has a reputation for being nude-friendly, but there's much more to Baker Beach than meets the eye. Being part of the Presidio, and right next to the Golden Gate Bridge, it's one of the most crowded beaches in the city. Hopefully, you can look past that because it's also one of the loveliest, with beautiful rolling waves, gorgeous cliff sides, and sunny shores. It's just as well that the water is cold here because the undertow is pretty strong. Everything else is simply gorgeous.

(Image via Flickr)